Property tax payments due by Oct. 15

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COVINGTON, Ky. - Property tax bills are in the mail to Covington residents and payment is due by midnight Oct. 15.
 
Residents have five different ways to pay their tax bill, including through an updated, user friendly online program.
 
There are two paths to the online taxpayer portal from the City website’s home page, which is HERE. Clicking the “Make a Payment” logo leads to the general tax page. Clicking “Property Tax” under the “Forms & Documents” section leads directly to the taxpayer portal, HERE.
 
(Note: Residents who previously saved a link to the payment page as a “favorite” on their computer need to update that link, if they haven’t done so in the last few months.)
 
A few things are different this year. 
  • After clicking the link, property owners will have four ways to search for their bill: by last name, name of their street, bill number, or property identification number (PIDN). Residents who search via the PIDN will need to type in dashes or periods- exactly how it’s listed on their bill. 
  • Owners will see several links that feature more historical information, including 12 years of assessed property value and 12 years of property tax and waste collection charges. 
  • Unpaid waste collection fees (from March) will be added to property tax bills. 
  • Residents who use a credit card or debit card to pay the tax bill, either online or in person at City Hall, will be charged a service fee of $3 or 2.65 percent, whichever is higher. 
Residents also can pay their bill: 
  • By mail at P.O. Box 643749, Cincinnati, OH 45264.
  • By calling (859) 292-2180.
  • In person at City Hall, 20 W. Pike St., between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
  • By dropping the payment off in a secure, after-hours drop box that appears as a slot on the outside wall of City Hall (to the left of the main entrance but not under the overhang). 
The property tax rate this year is the same as last year.

Property tax revenue represents about 14 percent of City tax revenue, and it’s used for everything from police officer salaries to incentives for small businesses to recreation programs.
 
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